Mastung
Mastung

Mastung  the capital of Mastung District, is a town in the Balochistan province of Pakistan. It is located at 29 48’0N 66 50’60E and has an altitude of 1701 metres (5583 feet).[1] Location Falling Rain  The town is also the administrative centre of Mastung Tehsil, an administrative subdivision of the district the town itself is administratively subdivided into two Union Councils.[2] Unions- District of Mastung Mastung used to be a sub-division of Kalat district. Due to administrative reasons, it was separated from Kalat in July 1991 and was given the status of a district. From 18 February 1992 Mastung has functioned as a separate district. The district derives its name from the locality Mastung. According to locals Mastung is made up of two words Mas and Tung. In Brahvi language Mas means mountain and Tung means hole. Mastung is situated at the bottom of Lack pass. When someone crosses the Lack Pass from Quetta, before entering into Mastung city, he feels that he is passing through a hole.

TitleDescription
Information
Location:Pakistan
In Urdu :مستونگ
City Council:Government Of Balochistan
Type:Capital of Mastung District
Local Language Name:Brahui, Persian,Punjabi (including Hindko & Saraiki dialects), Pashto, Baluchi, Sindhi (In Hindki and Frakhi dialects) and Urdu.
Province:Balochistan Pakistan
Coordinates :30.3810°N 67.7270°E
District:Mastung District
Region:Balochistan
Elevation:1,701 m (5,581 ft)
Language
Official Language:Urdu
Native Language:Brahui
Other Languages:Brahui,Urdu ,Engish
Government
Government Type:Government Of Balochistan
Area
Total Area:5,896 km2 (2,276 sq mi)
Population
Total Population:180,000 (2005)
Time zone
Time zone:PST (UTC+5)
Codes
Postal code:88200
Dialing code:(+92 843)
Vehicle registration:Three letters beginning with M and random four numbers

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About Mastung

Mastung

History of Mastung

Mastung used to be a sub-division of Kalat district. Due to administrative reasons, it was separated from Kalat in July 1991 and was given the status of a district. From 18 February 1992 Mastung has functioned as a separate district. The district derives its name from the locality Mastung. According to locals “Mastung” is made up of two words Mas and Tung. In Brahvi language Mas means mountain and Tung means hole. Mastung is situated at the bottom of Lack pass. When someone crosses the Lack Pass from Quetta, before entering into Mastung city, he feels that he is passing through a hole.[3] History of Mastung

Mastung was given another name (Khudabad) by Ahmedzai Khan but it was never popular. The district Mastung consists of two sub-divisions: Mastung and Kardgap. There are four tehsils: Mastung, Dasht, Kardgap and Khad Kucha. The district is divided into 13 Patwar circles and 280 Muzas.

Pre-colonial History

Mastung the capital of Mastung District Over view of Mastung Beautiful picture of Mastung

Little is known of the history of Mastung up to 977 AD, i.e. before the conquest of Balochistan by Mahmood Ghaznavi. History reveals that Muslim rulers ruled Balochistan from about the 7th century onward. It is likely that the Sewas, who belonged to the Rai-dynasty of Sindh, were ruling the Kalat State before the 7th century.It is most likely that the Sewas may have obtained the possession of Kalat after the fall of Sultan Feroz Dhoh of Delhi. The Sewas were Hindus who were deprived of power in Sindh about the middle of the 15th century. [4] Pre-colonial History
From 1530 and 1545

Between 1530 and 1545 Mastung was part of Kandahar Sarkar which at that time was under the rule of Kamran Khan. It was in the summer of 1543 that Emperor Humayyun on his retreat from India came to Mastung via Sibi. He camped in a garden close to Mastung (Pringabad). Humayyun had to leave his son Akbar, who was only one year old, in Pringabad and escaped with his party via Nushki to Garmsel and Herat (Afghanistan). On Humayyun return, two years later, Kandahar again came under his rule. Between 1556-1595 Kandahar and its dependencies remained under the Safavid dynasty and later it was again acquired by the Mughals. During the period of Mughal emperor Akbar, Mastung was a part of the eastern division of Kandahar Sarkar.The Ain-I-Akbari (Akbari Law) mentions Mastung as having a mud fort and paying an annual revenue of 10 Tumans and 8,000 Dinars in money and 470 Kharwars in grain, and as furnishing a contingent of 100 horses and 500 foot. The decay of the Mughal power coincides with the rise of the Brahuis to a position of near independence.[5] Between 1530 and 1545  
From 1695 to 1696

This state of affairs remained for twelve generations till the rise of Mir Ahmed who ruled from 1695 to 1696. At this time, Mastung was the capital of Kalat state and was under Nadir Shah who used to appoint the Khan. In 1736, he appointed Mir Muhabat as Khan of Kalat. Ahmed Shah Abdali was the successor of Nadir Shah.Ahmed Shah bestowed Quetta, Mastung, Harrand and Dajal on Nasir Khan The Great. In 1839 when Mehrab Khan was Khan of Kalat, the British army attacked and took Kalat. In 1854 a first treaty was signed between the Khan and the British. The British received some concessions, including permission to build railway and telegraph lines through Kalat territory. This situation prevailed till the partition of the sub-continent.[6] Mastung- balochistan.gov 

Education

Mastung was separated from Kalat
Cadet College Mastung is a military high school, for boys grades seven through twelve.In 1976, the Federal Government extended help for establishing a Cadet College in Balochistan to bring this province at par with other Provinces, thus providing equal opportunities to the talented and brighter students from Balochistan as well.The Project of establishing a Cadet College in Balochistan was conceived in March 1976. The President of Pakistan gave his blessings in 1979 and ECNEC approved PC-I in 1981. Present site was selected in 1982 and the construction of first two phases started in 1983. The college started functioning on April 09, 1987 with induction of its first entry of 60 cadets.Cadet College, Mastung is located in district Mastung; on RCD Highway (N-25 National Highway) at a distance of 54 km from Quetta (Capital of Balochistan) and 630 km from Karachi. It covers an area of 120 acres (0.49 km2).Students with age of 11-13 are admitted to CCM (Cadet College Mastung) after an entry test which is usually taken in winter of each year throughout Pakistan. This entry test is based on the course contents of 6th class (Grade 6). Top sixty students are then granted admission to CCM.

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